Suspended Energy

Dianna Osickey

Dianna Osickey

New York School of Interior Design

New York School of Interior Design

New York School of Interior Design

New York School of Interior Design

Suspended Energy

Dianna Osickey

New York School of Interior Design

New York School of Interior Design

New York School of Interior Design

New York School of Interior Design

Suspended Energy

Dianna Osickey

New York School of Interior Design

New York School of Interior Design

New York School of Interior Design

New York School of Interior Design

The intent to use found household objects was realized when I utilized coal and crystals, both salvaged from my turn of the century home. The coal sculpture is meant to change in form from multiple angles, with movement, and time of day. When viewing the piece on the short end the columns of coal are rectilinear and stacked neatly. Once the piece is viewed from the long side the shape becomes more organic. The profile of the pattern of coal is meant to represent the COVID-19 infection charts we were so bombarded with in 2020. The coal absorbs light and creates dense shadows and represent the heaviness of 2020. As an energy source the coal is representative of the suspended energy that we all felt hanging in the air while quarantined during the pandemic. The intermixed crystals are little beacons of hope refracting light in a playful and contrasting way. The crystals come alive for a 10 minute window each day when western sun hits the sculpture. Once movement is applied the pieces becomes kinetic and mesmerizing to watch. The up lighting and side light create a flurry of dynamic shadows. As a final testament to the year the entire sculpture could be lit on fire if relocated to an exterior setting.

Suspended Energy